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AE RESEARCH

Published research on Athletic Edge products proving to you the customer that they do as claimed instead of the usual fictitious marketing hype.

Effect of beta-alanine supplementation on the onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA) during treadmill running: Pre/post 2 treatment experimental design

Background

β-Alanine (βA) has been shown to improve performance during cycling. This study was the first to examine the effects of βA supplementation on the onset of blood lactate accumulation (OBLA) during incremental treadmill running.
 

Methods

Seventeen recreationally-active men (mean SE 24.9 4.7 yrs, 180.6 8.9 cm, 79.25 +- 9.0 kg) participated in this randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled pre/post test 2–treatment experimental design. Subjects participated in two incremental treadmill tests before and after 28 days of supplementation with either βA (6.0 g.d-1)(BA, n=8) or an equivalent dose of Maltodextrin as the Placebo (PL, n=9). Heart rate, percent heart rate maximum (%HRmax), %VO2max@OBLA (4.0 mmol.L-1 blood lactate concentration) and VO2max (L.min-1) were determined for each treadmill test. Friedman test was used to determine within group differences; and Mann-Whitney was used to determine between group differences for pre and post values (p<0.05).

Results

The βA group experienced a significant rightward shift in HR@OBLA beats.min-1 (p< 0.01) pre/post (161.6 19.2 to 173.6 9.9) but remained unchanged in the PL group (166.8 15.8 to 169.6 16.1). The %HRmax@OBLA increased (p< 0.05) pre/post in the βA group (83.0% 9.7 to 88.6% 3.7) versus no change in the PL group (86.3% 4.8 to 87.9% 7.2). The %VO2max@OBLA increased (p<0.05) in the βA group pre/post (69.1 11.0 to 75.6 10.7) but remained unchanged in the PL group (73.3 7.3 to 74.3 7.3). VO2max (L.min-1 ) decreased (p<0.01) in the βA group pre/post

(4.57 0.8 to 4.31 0.8) versus no change in the PL group (4.04 0.7 to 4.18 0.8). Body mass kg increased (p < 0.05) in the βA group pre/post (77.9 9.0 to 78.3 9.3) while the PL group was unchanged (80.6 9.1 to 80.4 9.0).


Effects of BETA-alanine supplementation on performance and body composition in collegiate wrestlers and football players

Abstract

Kern, BD and Robinson, TL. Effects of b-alanine supplementation on performance and body composition in collegiate wrestlers and football players. J Strength Cond Res 25(7): 1804–1815, 2011—The purpose of this study was to examine the effectiveness of b-alanine as an ergogenic aid in tests of anaerobic power output after 8 weeks of high-intensity interval, repeated sprint, and resistance training in previously trained collegiate wrestlers (WR) and football (FB) players. Twenty-two college WRs (19.9 6 1.9 years, age 6 SD) and 15 college FB players (18.6 6 1.5 years) participated in this double-blind, placebo-controlled study. Each subject ingested either 4 g-1d21 b-alanine or placebo in powdered capsule form. Subjects were tested pre and posttreatment in timed 300-yd shuttle, 90° flexed-arm hang (FAH), body composition, and blood lactate after 300-yd shuttle. Although not statistically significant (p . 0.05) subjects taking b-alanine achieved more desirable results on all tests compared to those on placebo. Performance improvements were greatest in the FB supplement group, decreasing 300 shuttle time by 1.1 seconds (vs. 0.4- second placebo) and increasing FAH (3.0 vs. 0.39 seconds). The wrestlers, both placebo and supplement, lost weight (as was the goal, i.e., weight bracket allowance); however, the supplement group increased lean mass by 1.1 lb, whereas the placebo group lost lean mass (20.98 lb). Both FB groups gained weight; however, the supplement group gained an average 2.1-lb lean mass compared to 1.1 lb for placebo. b-Alanine appears to have the ability to augment performance and stimulate lean mass accrual in a short amount of time (8 weeks) in previously trained athletes. Training regimen may have an effect on the degree of benefit from b-alanine supplementation.


Effects of a 7 week beta-alanine supplementation on anaerobic power output in female collegiate soccer, softball, and volleyball players

Abstract

Women’s collegiate soccer, softball, and volleyball are sports in which the metabolic demand for the athlete is primarily anaerobic, with soccer relying heavily on the fast-glycolytic energy system, and softball and volleyball nearly exclusively on phosphagen system. Training for these sports reflects this metabolic reliance. Supplementing with β-alanine has been shown in previous research to delay fatigue during high intensity exercise. PURPOSE: To examine the effectiveness of β-alanine as an ergogenic aid in tests of anaerobic power output following 7 weeks of high intensity interval, repeated sprint, and resistance training in previously trained female collegiate soccer (S), softball (SB), and volleyball (VB) players. METHODS: 23 soccer (19.4 ± 0.8 yr, age ± SD), 22 softball (19.4 ± 1.2 yr), and 9 volleyball players (18.6 ± 0.7 yr) participated in this double-blind, placebo controlled study.

Each subject ingested either 4 g/day β-alanine or placebo in powdered capsule form. Subjects were tested pre and post intervention in timed 300 yd. shuttle run, Wingate Anaerobic Power cycling test (WIN), 90˚ flexed arm hang (FAH), body composition, and blood lactate was measured following Wingate and 300 yd. shuttle run. RESULTS: The S and SB subjects taking β-alanine significantly improved on FAH compared to placebo: 6.37 sec ± 3.97 sec vs. -2.25 sec ± 2.2 sec, S supp vs. S placebo, 6.01 sec ± 5.35 sec vs. 1.39 sec ± 2.65 sec, SB supp vs. SB placebo, (p< 0.05). The VB subjects taking β-alanine improved FAH more than placebo, but not significantly: 7.78 sec ± 2.44 sec vs. 2.36 sec ± 1.45 sec, VB supp vs. VB placebo (p=.228). Subjects taking β-alanine significantly improved in the 300 yard shuttle (-1.51 sec ± 0.4 sec), while subjects taking placebo showed little change (0.13 sec ± 1.3 sec), (p<0.05). Though statistical differences were recorded between supplemented and placebo groups in 300 yd. shuttle run performance, no statistical differences were recorded within groups (S, SB, or VB), supp vs. placebo. Supplemented subjects (S, SB, VB) demonstrated lower WIN % power drop (-25.7% ± 12.2% vs. -30.44% ± 8.65%, supp vs. placebo), though not statistically significant. Blood lactate values following WIN and 300 yd. shuttle, while extremely high (≥ 8 mmol/L), were also not significantly different. No significant changes in body composition occurred within or between groups. CONCLUSIONS: In spite of no statistical change in body weight, body composition, or postexercise lactate, supplemented subjects performed better in tests of anaerobic power. PRACTICAL APPLICATIONS: The results of this study suggest that β-alanine has the ability to improve anaerobic power in a short amount of time (7 weeks) when combined with high intensity training. ACKNOWLEDGEMENT: The products were donated by Athletic Edge Nutrition. No other funding was received. The authors declare that they have no competing interests.


The effects of creatine supplementation with and without an Extract of Artemisia dracunculus on resistance training adaptations: preliminary findings.

Abstract

Co-ingesting creatine (5 g) with large amounts of glucose (e.g., 95 g) has been shown to enhance creatine and carbohydrate storage in muscle. It has been speculated that creatine transport is mediated in part by glucose and insulin. The increases in creatine retention are accompanied by an undesired caloric load and as a result, additional research has been undertaken to assess the effect of co-ingesting creatine with nutrients that may enhance insulin sensitivity. Co-ingestion of creatine (Cr) with an antihyperglycemic extract of Artemisia dracunculus (Russian tarragon (RT)), has been shown to influence plasma Cr levels comparable to co-ingestion of Cr and glucose [1].  However, other research has shown that short term (5 days) co-ingestion of Cr and RT (Cr+RT) did not enhance whole body creatine retention or muscle free creatine content [2].  The purpose of this on-going investigation was to compare the long-term effects of resistance training in combination with either Cr+RT, or Cr with carbohydrate (Cr+CHO), or carbohydrate (PL) ingestion.